Welcome to Evergreen Soaring!

Evergreen Soaring is a not-for-profit flying club operating in Washington State. We fly gliders, also known as sailplanes, and have joined together to own and operate the aircraft and equipment needed to enjoy our sport.

We are an association of diverse individuals with one thing in common: the love of soaring.

Schedule a Demo Ride!

A glider demo ride will offer you the thrill of a lifetime!

Evergreen Soaring offers demonstration flights for those who wish to become glider pilots or just want to experience soaring flight. Flights are conducted at the Arlington Municipal Airport.

You'll fly with an FAA-certificated Commercial Pilot in a two-place glider, starting with a tow as high as 3,000 feet above the airport. The flight will last anywhere from 20 minutes to an hour, depending on soaring conditions.

Intro Lesson

The FAST program gives you the opportunity to get a taste of what soaring is all about. It is a program that offers you an introductory lesson in flying a glider, during which you will handle the controls of the aircraft under the guidance of an FAA certificated glider flight instructor.

About Soaring

The freedom and exhilaration of soaring are incomparable! By using currents of rising air for lift, you can fly hundreds of miles over several hours on a good soaring day.

Soaring is also known as gliding - one of the oldest forms of flying. People were flying gliders for many years before powered airplanes came about, including the Wright Brothers! In the early days, a glider-ride usually meant a short flight, probably launched from a hilltop. Today we fly sailplanes: high performance aircraft that can stay aloft for long periods of time, and all with no motor!

"Evergreen Soaring exists to create and support excellent cross-country soaring pilots and to maximize their access to great soaring experiences."
- mission statement

What's New

XC Soaring in 2017 in Washington State

With the end of the soaring season for this year it is time again to review what happened in the world of XC soaring in the state of Washington (WS).  While the calendar year is not over yet, the OLC year 2018 started already on September 25.  This cutoff for the OLC 2017 may generally be enough to cover the thermalling season but wave flying is attracting some renewed interest lately and we have already some entries for the OLC 2018.

The 2017 Awards Banquet

November 4, 2017 saw the well attended annual SGC awards banquet at the Wilde Rover restaurant in Kirkland.  After enjoying a lively social hour and a nice dinner it was time for the awards and trophies to be handed out by awards chairman Craig Funston.  Evergreen Soaring members were well represented.  So here are the various winners:

Special Certificate (expression of appreciation for the dedication and effort given to our sport)

The 2017 Willy Burhen Cup (WBC)

September 24 marked the end of the OLC 2017 year and thus the end of this year’s WBC competition.  This is the annual competition to prove that XC soaring is possible and actually quite competitive on the “wet” side of the mountains.

Walla Walla/ Martin Field

Earlier this year - May 28, when we still enjoyed some soarable conditions - Ron Clark made another pioneering flight when he soared his venerable LS-3 from Arlington all the way to Walla Walla.  This flight (which include another Cascade crossing) amounted to 459 OLC points and was the best flight on the west side so far.  Ron liked what he saw and is now planning for some soaring exploration of the Wallowa mountains.  Incidentally, Bob Pattison from the PSSA just announced his plans to make a combined soaring/wine tasting excursion over the October 6,7 weekend and

Class G Airspace in the North Cascades

For most glider pilots in the USA Class G air space (uncontrolled air space) is something that is of no practical importance, except possibly for takeoff and landing.  Class G allows operations “clear of clouds” and with a minimum of 1 mile visibility”.  Over Arlington Class G extends to 700 ft above ground (AGL) and gliders don’t lend themselves to scud running.  We don’t operate unless the cloud base around Arlington is at least 2000 ft AGL for pattern flying and at least 3000 ft for extended local flying and then fly basically in Class E (500 ft below clouds, 1000 ft above

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